She Writes: Graphic Novels

This week we launch the first collection of titles for our “She Writes” series. First up, we're featuring graphic novels for a variety of ages, all written and illustrated by women. Below you'll find available formats, but we also have a curated list with additional titles in OverDrive that you can checkout here.

For Children (and up)

Phoebe and her Unicorn series by Dana Simpson
Grade 4+
Library Collection
OverDrive and Libby
“A pink, bubble-gum bonbon of a tale spun of a likable, albeit self-centered, fourth-grader and her magical, self-obsessed, although sometimes-kind, unicorn.”–Kirkus

Click series by Kayla Miller
Grade 3-7
Library Collection
OverDrive and Libby
“Olive is well-liked by her pals and peers in school, but she is distraught when her teacher announces the fifth-grade variety show, and everyone else immediately groups up without her. Who can't relate to feeling left out? Miller has introduced a rather large cast in this lovely debut, but everyone is distinct, and there are cues within each warmly illustrated, full-color panel to help keep readers on track.”–Booklist
Real Friends series by Shannon Hale
Grades 3-6
Library Collection
OverDrive and Libby
“Hale’s childhood struggles with friends and family come to achingly poignant life in this candid graphic memoir. Over five chapters, readers follow a bookish and shy Hale from her earliest days in school through fifth grade, as she zealously guards her first friendship (‘One good friend. My mom says that’s all anyone really needs'), negotiates forever-changing friendship politics, and tries to stay on the good side of her turbulent oldest sister.”–Publishers Weekly
Emmie & Friends series by Terri Libenson
Library Collection
OverDrive and Libby
“In her first children’s book, cartoonist Libenson (The Pajama Diaries) offers strikingly different visions of seventh grade through two very dissimilar narrators. School is stressful for shy, quiet Emmie; Katie, meanwhile, is breezily popular, confident, and beautiful. “–Publishers Weekly
Pashmina by Nidhi Chanani
Library Collection
OverDrive and Libby
“In this feminist graphic novel, a young woman searches for the truths of her past with the help of a long-lost aunt; Shakti, the Divine Mother Goddess; and a mysterious shawl…An original graphic novel, the first written and illustrated by an Indian-American creator, this is both a needed contribution and a first-rate adventure tale.”–Kirkus
El Deafo by Cece Bell
Library Collection
OverDrive and Libby
“Cece loses her hearing from spinal meningitis, and takes readers through the arduous journey of learning to lip read and decipher the noise of her hearing aid, with the goal of finding a true friend. This warmly and humorously illustrated full-color graphic novel set in the suburban '70s has all the gripping characters and inflated melodrama of late childhood: a crush on a neighborhood boy, the bossy friend, the too-sensitive-to-her-Deafness friend, and the perfect friend, scared away.”–School Library Journal
Stargazing by Jen Wang
Library Collection
OverDrive and Libby
“Wang tells a story that will ring true to just about any middle-schooler who's dealt with shifting friendships, but her additional insights into navigating differences within the Chinese American community will be a balm to readers in similar situations.”–Booklist

For Young Adults (and Older)

Through the Woods by Emily Carroll
Grades 7-12
Library Collection
OverDrive and Libby
A collection of five creepy, haunting stories that take you on a journey through the woods. Perfect for the fall and Halloween season. Recommended for grades 7-12, but also enjoyed adults young and old!
“Sure in her handling of line, color, and sequential art techniques, she revels in period settings, placing her five stories in identifiable historical eras that include colonial North America and the Roaring Twenties.”–Publishers Weekly

This One Summer by Jillian Tamaki and Mariko Tamaki
Library Collection
OverDrive and Libby
A moving coming of age story by cousins Jillian and Mariko Tamaki.
“Printed entirely in somber blue ink, the illustrations powerfully evoke the densely wooded beach town setting and the emotional freight carried by characters at critical moments, including several confronting their womanhood in different and painful ways.”–Publishers Weekly
Ms. Marvel series by G. Willow Wilson
Library Collection
OverDrive and Libby
Hoopla
“Kamala Khan is an ordinary girl from Jersey City who wants all the things the average teenager wants; to be pretty, to be popular, to be normal. But coming from a Pakistani Muslim family, Kamala feels anything but normal and wishes she could be like her hero, Captain Marvel.”–School Library Journal
The Prince and the Dressmaker by Jen Wang
Library Collection
OverDrive and Libby
“A talented seamstress and a prince with a secret will win readers’ hearts in Wang’s utterly charming graphic novel, which is set in a playfully tweaked version of 19th-century Paris and highlights identity, acceptance, and fashion. After creating a scandalous dress for an attendee of Prince Sebastian’s 16th birthday party, Frances—an overlooked seamstress with big dreams—accepts a position as personal seamstress for a mystery client.”–Publishers Weekly
Laura Dean Keeps Breaking Up With Me by Mariko Tamaki
Grades 9+
Library Collection
OverDrive and Libby
“Freddy finds herself in an on-again, off-again relationship with the impossibly cool Laura Dean, who, surely not by accident, has an air of James Dean about her, from her floppy hair to her slouchy posture to her piercing gaze. Touching gently but powerfully on topics of bullying, homophobia, and toxic relationships, this superb graphic novel has its finger on the pulse of teenage concerns.”–Booklist

Anya's Ghost by Vera Brosgol
Grade 7+
Library Collection
OverDrive and Libby
“A deliciously creepy page-turning gem from first-time writer and illustrator Brosgol finds brooding teenager Anya trying to escape the past—both her own and the ghost haunting her…A book sure to haunt its reader long after the last past is turned—exquisitely eerie.”–Kirkus

A Girl Called Echo by Katherena Vermette
Library Collection
OverDrive & Libby
“Echo is a Métis teen who finds herself drawn into her ancestors' past in the middle of a history lecture. A lonely outsider in her school and a newcomer in a group home, she's transported back in time to the events surrounding the Canadian Pemmican Wars.”–School Library Journal

For Adults

Good Talk: A Memoir in Conversations by Mira Jacob
Library Collection
OverDrive and Libby
An eye-opening and personal look at interracial families and the struggles Jacob has faced answering the questions of her biracial son, such as whether his Trump-voting grandparents hate him.
“Snippets of dialogue between Jacob (The Sleepwalker’s Guide to Dancing) and her family and friends form the basis of this breezy but poignant graphic memoir that takes on racism, love, and the election of President Trump…The ‘talks' Jacob relates are painful, often hilarious, and sometimes absurd, but her memoir makes a fierce case for continuing to have them.”–Publishers Weekly

Hyperbole and a Half by Allie Brosh
Library Collection
OverDrive and Libby
“Most pieces deal with Brosh's struggle with depression, an experience rarely expressed so clearly and specifically in other media as it is here. Even those unfamiliar with trials of such a condition will find this humorous depiction enlightening.”–Publishers Weekly
The Handmaid's Tale (Graphic Novel) by Margaret Atwood and Renee Nault
Library Collection
OverDrive and Libby
“Equal parts gorgeous and horrifying, Nault’s adaptation faithfully follows both the plot and style of Atwood’s 1985 dystopian novel. Narrator Offred lives in Gilead, a United States that is both unrecognizable and too familiar: the government strips women of their freedom in the name of protecting them, discards the old and infirm, and loves fetuses more than the living.”–Publishers Weekly
LaGuardia by Nnedi Okorafor
Library Collection
OverDrive and Libby
Hoopla
“Here, the stigmatized immigrant aliens are aliens from outer space, the Nigerians are the good guys, a family's ‘putting down roots' acquires novel implications, prosthetic body parts bypass the usual assumptions, and genocide turns up where you least expect it. This playful allegory joins evocative, beautiful art with a wild imagination and mind-bending plot that comes off as both sad and hopeful.”–Library Journal
Monstress series by Marjorie Liu
Library Collection: Volume 1, Volume 2, Volume 3, Volume 4, and Book 1
OverDrive & Libby: Volume 1, Volume 2, Volume 3, and Volume 4
Hoopla: Volume 1, Volume 2, Volume 3, Volume 4, and Book 1
“Stuffed with intricate myths, dense history, crisscrossing political relationships and magical technology, the world of Monstress is everything a fantasy reader could want. Protagonist Maika Halfwolf, a teenage orphan seeking to solve the mysteries of her childhood, is cranky yet relatable.”–NPR Books
Bitch Planet series by Kelly Sue DeConnick
Library Collection: Volume 1, Volume 2, and Triple Feature
OverDrive and Libby: Volume 1
Hoopla: Volume 1, Volume 2, and Triple Feature
“In one of the most stunning works of satire this medium has seen in recent memory, DeConnick (Pretty Deadly, Captain Marvel) and De Landro (X-Factor) craft a modern riff on pulp sci-fi exploitation novels that’s equal parts brutality and thoughtfulness.”–Publishers Weekly
Belonging: A German Reckons with History and Home by Nora Krug
Library Collection
OverDrive and Libby
“A graphic artist of German descent tries to come to terms with her family's history before she was born.Not only was Krug too young to have memories of the Nazi era, but her parents weren't born until 1946. Yet she feels drawn to what happened before, a legacy that amounts to a search for identity, a pilgrimage to the homeland that risks guilt and shame.”–Kirkus
Drawing Power: Women's Stories of Sexual Violence, Harassment, and Survival by Diane Noomin
Library Collection
OverDrive and Libby
Hoopla
“A stunning collection that viscerally highlights the pervasiveness of sexual violence and the multitude of ways survivors process trauma.”–Library Journal
Going Into Town: A Love Letter to New York by Roz Chast
Library Collection
OverDrive and Libby
“The highly regarded New Yorker cartoonist lets readers see the city she loves through her eyes. As Chast…notes early on, this isn't a guidebook–though it could help Manhattan newcomers navigate the streets and the subways.”–Kirkus
Can't We Talk About Something More Pleasant: A Memoir by Roz Chast
Library Collection
OverDrive and Libby
“‘Something more pleasant' than the certainty of old age and death is what Chast’s parents would prefer to talk about, in this poignant and funny text-and-cartoon memoir of their final years. Chast, a cartoonist who contributes frequently to the New Yorker, describes how her parents, George and Elizabeth, try her patience as she agonizes over their past and future.”–Publishers Weekly
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